When Choosing Extension Springs, Consider Qualities and Materials

By on September 12, 2013

Industrial handles

Extension springs, which are not to be confused with compression springs, are one of those engineering tools that normal, everyday people actually get to see. Look up a picture and you will recognize them to be very similar to the springs in bed frames, and in your storm doors. Unlike hydraulic pumps, grease fittings, and tapered roller bearings, these springs are some of the least exotic tools in the materials handling and engineering toolbox.

These springs are exceptional at cable tensioning, holding hatch doors closed, and making sure that air cylinders return to their starting positions. The beauty of these springs is that the more force you use to extend the spring, the more force the spring will use to keep its two connected points together. However, how do you choose the right extension springs?

  • Consider the qualities you want.
  • There are three qualities that are attributed to springs. Minimum load, maximum load, and rate. The minimum load indicates how many pounds of force are necessary to make the spring extend. The maximum load indicates how many pounds of force are necessary to make the spring extend to its fullest length. The rate indicates how hard the spring is to stretch, and a high rate indicates greater difficulty. Depending on your application you may want springs that stretch easily, and have a low rate, or springs with a significant maximum load so that they can stretch further.

  • Consider the materials you want.
  • Extensions springs that are made out of steel music wire have the highest strength. Spring tempered steel is a common material used where the spring must resist heat. Stainless steel is used as a primary material where you want to avoid corrosion. Most springs come available with either loop or hook ends. Naturally if the springs will be in damp or humid environments, then the stainless steel variety are optimal. Your environment will determine what kind of material your springs should be made out of.

Many manufacturers will let you order springs cut to a custom length. Remember, that depending on how you intend to use the springs, you may want to opt for safety springs. Normal springs can be exerted to the point of failure. Safety springs have draw bars, which protect the spring from over extension. When choosing extension springs, be cognizant of the environment they will be placed in, and what kind of strength or extra features you require. Continue reading here: www.reidsupply.com

About Online Magazine Publishing

8 Comments

  1. Mia Clark

    December 14, 2014 at 10:10 pm

    This is great information. I did not know that they made springs for heat resistance!

  2. Amelia Mullins

    January 13, 2015 at 10:12 pm

    This is great information. I did not know that they made springs for heat resistance!

  3. Clyde Reed

    February 12, 2015 at 10:20 pm

    This is great information. I did not know that they made springs for heat resistance!

  4. Herbert Hart

    March 14, 2015 at 9:19 pm

    This is great information. I did not know that they made springs for heat resistance!

  5. Karl Perez

    April 13, 2015 at 9:20 pm

    This is great information. I did not know that they made springs for heat resistance!

  6. Floyde Collins

    May 25, 2015 at 7:31 pm

    This is great information. I did not know that they made springs for heat resistance!

  7. Rick Knight

    June 25, 2015 at 12:37 pm

    This is great information. I did not know that they made springs for heat resistance!

  8. Dwight Bailey

    July 25, 2015 at 12:38 pm

    This is great information. I did not know that they made springs for heat resistance!

You must be logged in to post a comment Login

Leave a Reply